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A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place: Dining Rooms

2014 August 12
by Wheaton World Wide Moving
GH Dining Room

The dining room’s main function is serving meals, eating and socializing on special occasions. The well-defined purpose leaves you with a clear goal in organizing the room: to make serving and enjoying meals as pleasant and simple as possible.

The dining room is defined by the furniture you use and the “service circle.” The service circle incorporates the dining table and the area around it. The service circle may also include a storage cabinet for crystal, china and silver and a sideboard or side table to ease the serving of the meals.

Dining Room Table

Start by organizing the table. Remove everything that is stored there and determine whether the items belong there. If they don’t, then they should be moved to a more appropriate place in the home. Once you know what needs to be stored in this area, this will help you determine what additional storage you will need.

The most common issue with the dining room table is where to put the leaves and pads (if they come with your table). The best option to store these is in a closet close to the dining area. If you are buying a new table, consider buying one that comes with self-stored leaves and pads that don’t require any extra space.

Hutch or Cabinet

While relocating, you probably encountered how difficult it was to pack fine china, crystal and sterling silver. Storing these valuable items is no different. A traditional hutch or china cabinet is used for both storage and decoration and is best for storing these highly valued items.

Guide to Storing Fine China:

  • Stack it where it is unlikely to receive any kind of blow to the edges of plates and saucers or lips of cups. Place buffers such as felt pads, cardboard squares or even thick cloth napkins between the plates. Never stack china cups.
  • Racks for plates and dishes – There are simple wood or plastic frames with slots that hold plates apart from one another. They are made to sit securely on cabinet shelves and organize plates to you can easily remove them.
  • Pack away China – If you don’t use it a lot, there are quilted china packing cases to accommodate the number and sizes of your collection. These come equipped with zippered openings to prevent dust and dirt.
Storage Bags GH

If you are packing fine china away, use quilted/cloth packing cases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crystal is prone to scratches, which is essential to prevent when storing. Leave plenty of room between, never store anything inside crystal, don’t hang crystal stemware, store glasses standing up and avoid keeping on or under adjustable shelves. Just like fine china, you can also store in padded boxes or containers.

Sterling silver is extremely sensitive to its environment. Store silver away from other metals in a chest or box. Tarnish-resistant storage bags are also an option for storage. It’s best to keep silverware in its container in the cabinet or drawer.

Store linens close to where they are used. Place in a concealed area of the hutch or the sideboard. Lace or embroidered table cloths should be wrapped in acid-free paper.  Regularly rotate and refold your linens to prevent creases. Dried lavender sprigs in the folds will repel insects and lightly perfume the fabric.

Sideboard/Side Table:
Sideboard holds food while serving and stores vessels and utensils used when serving food. Keep the area uncluttered to provide a place to work with the food you are serving. The lower storage should be dedicated to over sized serving items.

Additional Storage:
Depending on the size and capacity of your hutch and sideboard, you may need extra storage for seasonal items and replacement supplies. Because of the limited space, more furniture is usually not the answer. Shelving, hanging plate racks and wine racks are natural additions for more storage.

Keeping Up:
Every few days, walk through the dining room and do a clutter inspection to ensure that nobody has left items on the dining room table or sideboard. Remove what you find and place it back to where it belongs.

A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place: Family and Living Rooms

2014 August 8
by Wheaton World Wide Moving
GH Family Room

The organization of the family and living rooms after relocating is an important task because it is the center of family entertainment, relaxation and recreation. In some homes, the family and living rooms aren’t two separate rooms; but in older houses, the family room was for relaxation and the living room was used for formal entertaining. Whether you have two separate rooms or just one, this article will help you organize these complex spaces. Work your way through each zone, starting with the area with the most traffic to the one with the least.

Electronics/Entertainment Center:
This area is the focal point of the room and the center of entertaining your family and guests. Before organizing this area, ask these questions:

-    How many components do you want to include in your entertainment center? TV, cable box, Internet wireless router, DVD players, video came consoles, etc.
-    How many CDs, DVDs and VHS tapes do you own and how many do you buy a year?
-    Will the stereo and speakers be stored with the TV and is it part of a home theater system?
-    Do you prefer to keep the electronics hidden?
-    How much wall and floor space is available for the entertainment center?
-    Will you need to make connections to computers or other devices?

An entertainment center is the best way to organize your various media and entertainment pieces. Usually, the placement of the entertainment center will be dictated by cable wiring and electrical outlets. To ensure the best use of space, make sure to measure the area. Entertainment centers usually come equipped with shelves or drawers to store CDs, DVDs and video games. If the entertainment center does not offer shelving or drawers, you can add standalone storage or shelves along the wall. Keep equipment and accessories as close to each other when not in use, for example, controller by the console and TV remote close to the TV.

Entertaining Area:
This space is defined by a couch, coffee table and surrounding chairs. The coffee table is the center of the room, which is a natural place for food, beverages, books and magazines. When searching for a coffee table, consider what style you would like, how many people will be using it and whether you would like additional storage.

Reading Area:
If you would like a separate area for reading, put a comfortable chair, reading light and a small side table to create this space. To avoid clutter, the table should be just enough for a beverage and a book.

Shelves:
Shelves in a living or family room are commonly devoted to books, but can be used for other storage as well. Follow these general rules of what to place on shelves:

Have a purpose – Individual items must have a reason for being on the shelf. A picture is there to be displayed. Your eye glasses shouldn’t be there nor should a pile of mail.

Collect to declutter – Individual items that are part of a collection should be grouped together in their own section of a shelf.

Contain when possible – Some items you might like to put on a shelf are best kept within a box or other container.

Fireplace and ManteGH Living Rooml:
This area turns into a casual resting place , which tends to invite clutter. It is important to keep this area clutter-free and keep items that are used in the fireplace nearby. The brick area around the fireplace should only be used for fireplace accessories and decorative urn or sculpture. Keep wood tidy in a large fireproof basket, tin bucket, metal cradle or canvas satchel enough for one fire. For the mantel, use it as a showcase for one or two of your decorative (fireproof) pieces. The less there is on the mantel, the more items will stick out that don’t belong.

Chests, Side Tables and Supplementary Furniture:
Now you have your living and family room in order, but you still need to determine what additional storage is needed and what other types of furniture you may want to add to complement the socialization, entertainment or relaxation. Chests are a great way to provide long term storage, a place to sit or a surface for decorative items or lighting. Side tables and end tables are useful additions to the family and living rooms for their surface, drawer or shelf space they provide. A small trolley or caddy bar is great for entertaining, but should be able to fit neatly in the corner when not in use.

Windowsills, Pianos and Other Flat Surfaces:
These surfaces tend to be a temporary resting places for items, which can cause clutter. There are two strategies for keeping the clutter away: No vacancy rule – nothing is allowed on these surfaces at all times and creating a focal point, which will showcase the area and prevents items from being put in that area.

Keeping Up:
Two for one – Integrate your clutter check as part of the regular dusting and vacuuming. Return anything out of place to its proper location.

Periodic Update - Once a month, check the magazines and catalogs on your coffee table and recycle those that are out-of-date.

Disc Order - Every few months make sure that your CDs, DVDs and video games aren’t piling up. If you need more storage, you may have to add an extra tower or rack.

Come back on Tuesday, August 12 to organize the dining room area of your home.

A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place: Bathrooms

2014 August 6
by Wheaton World Wide Moving
GH Bathroom 2

The bathroom is one of the busiest place in the home, so finding the time to unpack and organize after relocating is essential. The bathroom also is the most confined space, which presents challenges in avoiding clutter, but because of the size, is relatively simple to organize. The solution is putting the items close to where they are needed as well as tailoring to the number and type of people using the bathroom.

Family bathrooms face challenges of organizing tissues, toilet paper, cups, medicine, towels as well as the individual products for particular members of the family. Break up the bathroom into zones to focus on these specific needs, such as the medicine cabinet, sinks and vanities, shower and bath, toilet storage, walls, doors and floor space.

Medicine Cabinet:
The medicine cabinet is ideal to keep all of those small everyday items well organized and out of sight. To start, remove everything and give the cabinet a good cleaning. Throw away empty containers and expired medications (Make sure you dispose of them properly by checking poison control). Organize what is left by putting items into groups. For example, put everything to do with dental care in the same area. Take out the items that don’t fit and either store them under the sink or put it in a smaller container to fit in the cabinet.

Sinks anGH Bathroomd Vanities:
The area around your sink provides a place to put everyday items near where they will be used, but may not fit in the medicine cabinet. Organize this zone from top to bottom, starting with the sink and moving to the drawers.

The surface holds personal care items that are used every day. Whatever you decide to put on the surface, keep it contained with a caddy, baskets, trays or bins.

Drawers give you the opportunity to organize often-used supplies, such as cosmetics, while still providing quick and easy access. Organize the drawers based on type of products and try to keep the groups separate.

Beneath the sink is a good area for oversized items and concealing items that don’t quite fit anywhere else, for example, cleaning items and back up supplies. Add door racks, baskets and specialized bucket to achieve optimal storage and organization. Keep in mind the area under the sink can be reached by younger children, so you may want to consider a safety latch.

 

Shower and Bath:
To avoid clutter around the edges of the shower/bath area, use wire or plastic storage containers. Corner shelves in the shower are a great way to store products for multiple people. If toys are used in the bathtub, keep them contained with something as simple as a bucket.

Toilet Storage:
This seems to be an odd area to provide storage, but there are multiple ways to do so. On top of the toilet tank is a small surface that you can place a caddy. The slim surface between the toilet and the wall can have hanging or standing storage. Étagères are an extra-long cabinet to fit over your toilet tank, which provides the most efficient storage in the bathroom. Adding shelves above or beside the toilet provides storage, but make sure to measure and buy shelving that is meant for the bathroom.

Walls, Doors and Floor Space:
When seeking storage in the bathroom, you will have to look at all surfaces as potential storage – no matter how big or small.

Hooks, pegs, shelves and bars provide effective storage for towels along the walls. If you can’t find room on the wall, the back of the bathroom door is a great option with over the door shelves or hooks. If you have ample square footage, standing cabinets and storage towers come in various sizes to provide extra storage. Hampers are ideally kept in the bathroom and can be found in different shapes and sizes, including free-standing ones or bags that can be hung from different places.

Keeping Up:
Once the bathroom is organized it requires minimal organization maintenance that can be done during routine cleaning.

Date Check: Every six months go through the medicine cabinet to discard medications that are empty and expired.

Prune Publications: Take a minute to look through the magazines on the magazine rack and remove old issues.

Inventory Assessments: Before shopping, check the levels of personal products, including toilet paper.

 

Come back on Friday, August 8 to explore the organization of family and living rooms.

A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place: Kids’ Bedrooms

2014 August 4
by Wheaton World Wide Moving
organized-childs-bedroom-fb

Relocating to a new home can be challenging for children. A child is more likely to embrace the idea of moving if they are involved in the process, especially when it comes to unpacking their room. Keeping the child engaged will not only teach them to organize and maintain their room, but will help them feel more at home.

Despite the child’s age, there are basic principles that are fundamental to organizing a child’s room. The more the process of organization is innovative, interesting and part of a daily routine, the more likely the child will be to make the effort to stay organized.

Make sure the storage that you pick is safe and adaptable. Divide the room up into zones and begin with the messiest area. At that point, invite the child to help organize in order for them to feel vested in the process. Some of the zones that we will go over may not apply to your child’s room, so feel free to skip over these and apply what is relevant.

1.    Toy Storage
The first step in getting toys in order is to get rid of their old or broken ones. By listening to your children’s input, you can figure out the little details of their personal preferences.  This is also a great opportunity to teach your children about the value of charity.

For infants, don’t be afraid to donate toys that never get played with. You also can store these in the closet then reintroduce them later as they may develop interest in them. Put their favorite toys in a bag and move it to where the child plays throughout the day – playpen, changing table, stroller, etc.

Benches, boxes, chests, hampers, bin consoles and shelves provide the best type of storage for toys. Remember to keep the toys together by group and label with words or pictures (depending on the age) to help nourish the child’s organizational skills.

2.    Work/Art Space
You can create this area with just a small desk or table, light and drawers for art supplies. This space’s functionality will change as the child matures and can be turned into a homework/computer area. Recycled plastic containers with lids, such as plastic butter tubs, jars or drink bottles, are also great ways to organize art supplies.

A child’s art area can result in a mess, so follow these rules to maintain a clean environment:
a.    Keep cleanup gear close – Have paper towels, moist towels and rags on hand for the accidents that need to be cleaned up quickly.
b.    Use appropriate supplies – Make sure the supplies are non-toxic and water-soluble.
c.    Contain creativity – Keep the art supplies in containers and explain they must be put back into the correct area when not in use.

3.    Bed/Play Area

The bed usually ends up as an extension of play or recreation area. The key is to provide enough storage and organizers to keep things tidy around the bed without letting those additions to become part of the problem.

A bedside table, just like an adult bedside table, should be easily accessible with not too much surface area to gather clutter.

The child’s bed is traditionally a little smaller than an adult bed, so the storage underneath the bed will have to be a bit smaller. To overcome the challenge of bunk beds, consider putting a small shelf for books and toys, hang a lamp on the ceiling or wall or use a hanging basket as a nightstand for the top bunk.

If there is room, a small table for younger kids to play board games or a dressing table for older children may be ideal to add in the bed/play area.

4.    Clothes, Closets and Dressers

There are two key principles to a child’s closet: accessibility and versatility.  First, the focus needs to be on easy access and intuitive locations. Secondly, the closet will have to change as the child changes.  Use organizers that will adapt to the child’s age as they grow. A great way to organize is to use shelving and drawer units.

Here are some rules to follow when organizing clothes:

a.    Organize low to high – What children wear everyday should be within reach. Use the higher shelves and hard-to-reach areas for out of season items.
b.    Avoid hangers – Hangers are a hassle for kids, use pegs or fold and store on shelves instead.
c.    Spell it out – Pictures and labels can help teach the child to place where their clothes go.
d.    Laundry entertainment – To get kids in the habit of putting dirty clothes in a hamper, make a fun game or put a face on the hamper with a big hole for the mouth.

A dresser should once again be an area of overflow. The best type to buy is a three-drawer wooden dresser that can be used as a changing table then converted to a dresser for a toddler. Drawer dividers are always useful for smaller clothing items.

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5.    Book Storage

Books are a must for a child’s growth. A book shelf is a preferable way to keep the books in decent shape and avoid placing books in the toy box.
There are a few other products, such as backpack hooks and hanging organizers, that can keep a kid’s room organized.

Keeping up:

To make it easier on everyone, be diligent in keeping your children involved in the organizational process by using these guidelines:

Toy patrol – Every night as a bedtime ritual your child will go on “toy patrol” to put toys back where they belong.
The pickup path – Whatever is in the way from the bed to the door will need to be picked up and placed in the correct area. It’s important to keep a safe path in case of emergencies.
Weekly visits – Checkup weekly to make sure the storage is being used and maintained correctly.

Tomorrow, August 5, we will tackle the bathroom area in the fourth part of our organization series.

 

Find more tips for moving with children here: http://www.wheatonworldwide.com/planning-guides/how-to-move-with-kids/

Reference: “Clutter Rescue” by the Good Housekeeping Research Institute
Photos: Good Housekeeping

Combat Stress with 20 Minutes of Exercise

2014 July 17
by Wheaton World Wide Moving
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Moving inevitably will cause stress under any circumstances, but one of the most important ways to combat it is exercising 20 minutes a day.

Exercising just 20 minutes a day can benefit your physical and mental health. Here’s how:

  • Exercise increases the flow of the blood to the brain, just as it improves circulation to the heart and the rest of the body.
  • Increased core temperature during exercise may lead to reduced muscle tension.
  • Activity also stimulates the growth of nerve cells in the part of the brain involved in memory. When we’re stressed, cortisol and adrenaline are surging and we forget things. In the brain, cortisol is binding with receptors in the hippocampus, the seat of memory formation and learning. If stress is left unchecked over time key connections between nerve cells in the brain won’t function as well, impairing memory and ability to take in new information and raising the risk for depression and anxiety.
  • Exercise produces neurohormones like norepinephrine that are associated with improved cognitive function, elevated mood and learning. It improves thinking dulled by stressful events.
  • Physical activity helps to bump up the production of your bran’s feel-good neurotransmitters, serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine, which can affect mood and anxiety levels.
  • Blood flow drains metabolic waste products away.
  • Exercise pumps blood containing oxygen, fluids and nutrients to active muscles.

Relocating can be expensive, so here are some ways to save money and exercise at the same time:

  • Go for a walk! If you have a dog, take them because they need it just as much as you do! Go to a park or around the block. It’s always good to get fresh air.
  • You don’t have a buy a workout DVD’s anymore (you can if you want). You can find workout and instructional videos all over the internet and they are free! Find something you would like and keep up with it. Some places to find these at youtube.com or Pinterest. Learnvest.com posted the best free workouts online: http://www.learnvest.com/2013/01/10-free-workout-sites-youll-love/
  • Put together a routine. For example: 10 pushups, 20 sit ups, 25 squats, 20 lunges (10 per leg), 80 jumping jacks and 60 second wall sits. Repeat three times or when 20 minutes is up.
  • Do you love playing sports? Join a recreational league and play your favorite sport. You might even make new friends!
  • If you sit most of the day, take a walk on your break or leave some time for your lunch. Sitting all day is not good for your health, so the more you move throughout the day, the better.

Remember certain exercises aren’t for everyone. Know your limits. Start small and work your way up. It’s better to be doing something than nothing! Get exercising!
References: Community Health Network, Learnvest

Need a Vacation? Visit These Top Vacation Spots in the Country

2014 July 15
by Wheaton World Wide Moving
Ocean City

Want to get away after a move across the country or just need a vacation? You are not alone! About 89 percent of people in the United States are planning a summer trip this year, according to a survey by TripAdvisor. These are the top destinations around the United States.

Key West, Fla. – The Southernmost city in the continental U.S. is a 120-mile long island chain connected to mainland Florida by US 1. Obviously, the main attraction is the beach but there is a lot to do and see,  such as the John Pennkamp  Park (the nation’s first underwater park), Duval Street, Theater of the Sea, the Everglades, Dry Tortugas National Park, just to name a few.

SanDiego

San Diego, Calif. Photo from Orbitz

San Diego, Calif. – San Diego is known for their extensive beaches, mild climate year-round and natural deep water harbor. Things to do include Balboa Park, Belmont amusement park, San Diego Zoo, San Diego Zoo Safari Park and SeaWorld San Diego.  San Diego hosted 32 million visitors in 2012. Between Coronado, the Ansa-Borrego Desert and the Laguna Mountains, there is plenty to do whether it’s relaxing by the beach or spending a day hiking and exploring.

San Francisco, Calif. – The City by the Bay is known for its cool summers, fog, steep rolling hills, eclectic culture, architecture and, of course, the Golden Gate Bridge, cable cars and Alcatraz Island.  Every neighborhood in San Francisco has its own personality, but the most popular is the Marina District that has perfect views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Pier 39, sample cheese at the Ferry building, and Delores Park across from Ocean Beach. Fisherman’s Wharf is San Francisco’s most popular attraction where you can visit Pier 39 and watch sea lions lounge on the rocks all day.

Virginia Beach, Va. – The city is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as having the longest pleasure beach in the world. Virginia Beach is a resort city with miles of beaches and hundreds of hotels, motels and restaurants along its oceanfront. It is also home to several state parks, several long-protected beach areas, three military bases, a number of large corporations and two universities. The Virginia Beach boardwalk is three miles lined with hotels and restaurants with lanes for walkers, bicycles, roller blades and surreys.

Orlando, Fla. – What else can you say about the city that has Disney World – aka “the Most Magical Place on Earth”? Orlando is one of the leading tourism destinations in the world, boasting 59 million visitors a year.  The resort is 42,000 acres, with 24 resort hotels, four theme parks, two water parks and four golf courses.  Other non-Disney parks in Orlando, include SeaWorld Orlando and Universal Orlando Resort.

Ocean City, Md.  – Ocean city stretches along 10 miles of beach from the inlet to the Delaware State line. It offers a three-mile classic wooden boardwalk lined with hotels, food, games and shopping. Ocean City is visited mostly by people living in the Mid-Atlantic region, which hosts eight million visitors annually.

Destin, Fla. – Who wouldn’t want to go to a place that has beautiful, clear green water and beaches with the whitest, softest sand in the world? Destin is located on Florida’s Emerald Coast and sees 4.5 million visitors each year. One of the most popular activities in Destin is chartering fishing vessels. You can visit the two-year old Destin boardwalk that has water attractions, restaurants, zip lining and amusement rides.

New York Times Square - Photo from Wikipedia

New York Times Square – Photo from Wikipedia

 

New York, N.Y. – Home to more than 8 million people and the most populated city in the United States, the Big Apple hosts around 55 million visitors annually. The many districts and landmarks will keep you busy the entire time, with the most popular being Times Square, Broadway Theater District, Empire State Building, Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island, Central Park, Rockefeller Center and the list goes on. No wonder why they call it “the city that never sleeps.”

Las Vegas, Nev. – Leave the kids at home and head to the Entertainment Capital of the World, which hosts the best casinos, shopping, fine dining and nightlife in the country. Stay and walk on the Las Vegas strip, which is 4.2 miles long and has 15 of the world’s largest hotels. The most popular, free attractions are the fountains at the Bellagio, the volcano at the Mirage and Festival Fountain at Caesar’s Palace. If you have any money left over after hitting the numerous casinos, go see one of the many shows Las Vegas has to offer.

Myrtle Beach, S.C. – The Grand Strand stretches 60 miles of the South Carolina coast, making Myrtle Beach a vacation destination for 14 million visitors in the spring, summer and fall months. With 87 golf courses in the area, Myrtle Beach is a golfer’s paradise.  There is plenty to do, such as visiting Broadway by the Beach, Carolina Opry, Barefoot Landing, Legends in concert as well as countless restaurants and bars.

Where do you and your family like to go on vacation? We would like to know!

 

 

 

References: TripAdvisor.com, Disney.com, Wikipedia.com, Chamber of Commerce Sites for each city

The Upsides of Downsizing and How to Prepare

2014 July 5
by Wheaton World Wide Moving

Are you considering downsizing to a new home? Sometimes downsizing comes by choice, sometimes by constraint. No matter the reason, downsizing has some serious upsides.

The Upsides

  • A Simpler Life: Downsizing means you can sort through your things and decide what you really do or do not need. This will make life easier, since you’ll only be living with the things that you actually use or that truly make you happy. You won’t be constantly wading through needless items.
  • Cash: You probably won’t have room for everything when you move into your new home. Many downsizers hold yard sales prior to their move. You can also sell your extra items on the internet. For any antique items, consider contacting a professional dealer to help you assign value and sell your items. This can mean extra cash for you and fewer things to pack and move.
  • Easier Maintenance: Having a smaller (and less cluttered) home means that cleaning and maintenance becomes so much easier–vacuuming the house is no longer an all-day chore, and you don’t have to wade through a sea of litter just to scrub the kitchen counters.

How to Prepare and Pack

Downsizing’s main benefits come from de-cluttering your home and your life. This will require preparation before you move in order to decide what you’re taking with you and what you’ll be giving away, selling, or throwing out. As you sort through your things room by room, put items in separate piles. These piles can be given labels like keep, sell, donate, trash.

Deciding which pile each item belongs to can be difficult. When you look at a pile of your belongings, you may not see clutter, but a lifetime of memories. And even for practical, household items, you may not realize what you really need and what you’re just storing needlessly. For help determining what you do and don’t need, ask yourself these questions:

  • What is the purpose of this item?
  • Do I have another item that serves the same purpose?
  • When was the last time I used it?
  • How often do I use it?
  • Do I love this item?
  • Does it have sentimental value that is irreplaceable?
  • Is it in good shape?
  • Is there someone else I know who would benefit from this more than I would?
  • Is there a place or need for it in my new home?

When you’ve decided what to do with each item, take action as soon as possible. Donate your donation items. Sell the items you want to sell. Getting rid of your items quickly means you won’t end up deciding unnecessarily to keep them later and will make it that much easier when moving day arrives.

For more helpful tips or questions about downsizing or moving, contact us.

Piano Moving: Don’t Let Your Piano Fall Flat

2014 July 3
by Wheaton World Wide Moving

When you’re moving, it’s difficult to figure out how to safely transport your piano. Whether your piano is a family heirloom or you bought it brand new, it is a prized possession that requires great care.

You can move your piano yourself, or you can hire professional movers to move it for you. To plan for either scenario, you should know what to do for each.

If You’re Moving a Piano Yourself

  • Ask for help. Pianos are extremely heavy. The most important thing you need to do if you’re moving a piano yourself is to enlist other people in the process. Ask friends, family members, or neighbors to assist in lifting and maneuvering the piano down stairs, up ramps, and into the truck. Do not even attempt to do this by yourself.
  • Secure the keyboard lid before lifting or moving the piano. You don’t want the keys to get damaged. Lock the lid if you can.
  • Wrap the piano in blankets or protective tarps. You can also add padding if you like. Make sure the corners are protected and there aren’t any exposed surfaces that could get scratched. Be careful when securing the coverings that you don’t get any tape on the piano’s surface.
  • Use either a furniture dolly or heavy duty straps to lift and move the piano. A dolly is preferable. You will still want to use straps to fasten the piano to the dolly.

If You’re Hiring Piano Movers

  • Check that your moving company is capable of moving pianos. If you’re hiring a moving company to handle your entire move, don’t assume pianos are something they can manage. Not every moving company is equipped to handle large instruments.
  • Consider hiring specialists. Some moving companies dedicate themselves to moving pianos and other large instruments. If you don’t need a full-service moving company, then piano-specific movers are worth looking into.
  • Understand that damage may still happen. No one is perfect. However, movers are much less likely to damage your piano while moving it than you are.

Other Considerations

  • Pianos should never be moved by their legs. The legs are delicate and break easily.
  • If you’re moving from one climate to another, you may need to re-tune your piano after it has acclimated to the change.

For experienced and reliable piano movers, contact us today for an estimate!

Meet new neighbors after a relocation by shopping for groceries with your dog

2014 May 15

Our dog Ripley helped us meet new neighbors after our relocation.

Our dog Ripley helped us meet new neighbors after our relocation.


Relocating from Oklahoma to Indiana was a stressful experience for me and my family. Our relocation was prompted by my husband’s job transfer. Essentials had been packed and taken with us on our drive to get us through a few days until the professional relocation company delivered our furniture. We arrived in Indiana to an empty house. The first few days were a little like camping. After a long car ride and sitting in an empty house, the family was starting to get a little stir crazy.

New to the city and neighborhood, we decided to get out and about. So, we leashed up our dog, Ripley, and went to the local farmers market. It was a great experience! We met lots of locals and several of our neighbors as well as many local farmers. I even met a local rancher and purchased some meats to grill that evening. Our dog enjoyed exploring and meeting new canine friends, too. Many people stopped to chat with us because Ripley helped break the ice. It was a win-win and made us feel at home more quickly.

If you just moved to a new community, get out and explore by taking a trip to the local farmers market. The markets are free to roam, many have live entertainment and most have some prepared foods and snacks, which are perfect if your appliances haven’t arrived yet. Just being outside around other local people and the fresh, brightly colored fruits and veggies makes you feel more welcome.

Our family has gone to the local farmers market every Saturday it’s open. I love having the option to take my dog shopping for groceries!

Click here for a list of farmers markets in your area.

How to live with roommates…successfully

2014 May 10
by Wheaton World Wide Moving

According to your standards, is leaving your shoes on the dining room table unacceptable? What may seem obvious to you may not be to a roommate.

Recent studies suggest that roommates are replacing spouses in the 20th Century. As a Millennial who has successfully lived with the same roommate for three years, I’m here to tell you successfully living with a roommate is possible.

Talk, talk, talk
Communication is a little detail that can make a BIG difference when living with others. Open and honest communication between roommates is crucial. This is especially true for roommates with a strong history of friendship. Confronting your roommates about a problem will be worth it in the long run. Allowing it to fester will only allow passiveness to pry its way into your living space.

Start with chores
As silly and elementary as it may sound, having a chore chart can save a lot of drama. Get as creative and cute with your chore chart as you want. Visit the craft store and decorate your chore chart to your heart’s desire then simply list each roommates’ name with the rotating chore(s) for which they are responsible. Understanding who is to do what around the house will establish expectations.

Expectation
In a perfect world, one could assume that everyone would have common courtesy when it comes to ‘rules of the house’. However, that’s not always the case. Clearly communicating one another’s expectations is a must. Here are some conversation starters:

  • Are we going to allow pets in the house? Who will be responsible for them?
  • Will we divide up the cost for food? Or will this remain separate?
  • What boundaries will we have for the common areas?
  • Any rules for visitors: family, friends, significant others, etc.?
  • Will there be a quiet time? Ex: During the week days after 11:00 p.m.

I am certain that with these tips, some cheap wine and good laughs, living with roommates can be some of the best years of your life!